Religious Holy Day Calendar

2016 through 2019 Academic Years

Sunday is the principle day of worship for most Christian communities. Many Christian denominations ask their members to refrain from unnecessary work on Sundays in order to render worship, to experience the joy of the Lord's Day, and to relax both the body and mind. Roman Catholics are obliged, on Sundays and other holy days of obligation, to attend Mass, which is offered at a variety of times in the chapels of the University and at Catholic parishes.

Eastern Orthodox Christians follow either the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Thus, religious observances may vary among Eastern Orthodox Christians.

Hindu holy days are calculated according to both the solar and lunar calendars and are also specific to the location of a given observance, so the dates for a festival may vary across the globe. Regional variations on the celebrations and customs surrounding certain festivals mean that the date of an observance will differ, dependent on the pañcāṅga (religious almanac) of a particular community of Hindus. The dates given below are for the major Hindu festivals, though there are numerous other festivals, fasts, and commemorations that may be observed by Hindus throughout the year. The almanacs are released annually at the Hindu New Year (Spring) and the Gujarati New Year (Autumn), and will include minor adjustments to festival dates due to any changes in the angle of the Earth's rotation. As such, the following is for guidance purposes only. 

Jewish holy days begin and end at sundown on the first and last days listed. The Jewish Sabbath occurs weekly and is the holiest day of the Jewish liturgical year.  The Sabbath begins at sundown on Friday evening and concludes on Saturday evening. It commemorates the seventh day of creation. The Torah teaches that on the seventh day, God rested from, and rejoiced in, the work of creation. Traditionally, Jews do not perform any work during this time, and Jews of a range of observance practices (or denominations) commemorate the Sabbath in some way. 

Muslim holy days are calculated on a lunar calendar and are thus approximate. Muslims are  mandated by the teachings of Islam to attend a prayer service every Friday, and are not allowed to attend to work-related issues during the time of the prayers. Friday prayer (or Jum’ah prayer) starts at 1:30 PM and ends at 2:10 PM.

Students may ask for travel time to return home for the beginning of religious observance.

Provost’s Policy Accommodating Students’ Religious Observances

Georgetown University promotes respect for all religions.  Any student who is unable to attend classes or to participate in any examination, presentation, or assignment on a given day because of the observance of a major religious holiday (see below) or related travel shall be excused and provided with the opportunity to make up, without unreasonable burden, any work that has been missed for this reason and shall not in any other way be penalized for the absence or rescheduled work. Students will remain responsible for all assigned work. Students should notify professors in writing at the beginning of the semester of religious observances that conflict with their classes. The Office of the Provost, in consultation with Campus Ministry and the Registrar, will publish, before classes begin for a given term, a list of major religious holidays likely to affect Georgetown students.  The Provost and the Main Campus Executive Faculty encourage faculty to accommodate students whose bona fide religious observances in other ways impede normal participation in a course.  Students who cannot be accommodated should discuss the matter with an advising dean.

Tradition Holiday 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019-2020
Islam Lailatul-Qadr 

“Night of Power”, celebrated during Ramadan, marks the anniversary of the night that the first verses of the Qur'an were revealed to the prophet Muhammad. Muslims also believe that on this night their fate in the following year is determined. They thus pray fervently all night for God’s mercy and salvation (in a practice called, ehyaa, or "revival").

July 2nd June 21st June 10th May 31st
Islam

Eid-al-Fitr                                                           Often abbreviated as Eid,it marks the end of Ramadan. Eid is an Arabic word meaning "festivity", while Fitr means "to break the fast." This holy day thus marks the breaking of the month-long fast of Ramadan.

July 7th - July 9th June 26th- 28th June 15th - 17th June 5th - 7th
Christian - Catholic The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary

It is a feast day for Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox Christians following the Gregorian calendar, and is often referred to as the Dormition of Theotokos by Orthodox Christians. Roman Catholics are obligated to attend Mass on this day. Over the centuries, the Church, inspired by the Holy Spirit, has appreciated more and more the esteemed role of Mary in salvation history. As the mother of Jesus the Savior, she is known to have a unique relationship with Christ. Principally, she is a powerful intercessor, drawing us into a deepened intimacy with the Divine and giving a profound courage in the face of death. A major teaching of the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church is that Mary, because of her special role in salvation history, was taken directly to heaven at the time of her death, instilling hope in the hearts of Christians for the fulfillment of Christ’s promise that those who die with Him will rise with Him.

August 15th August 15th August 15th August 15th
Christian - Orthodox (Julian)

Dormition of Theotokos                             It is a feast day for Roman Catholics and Eastern Orthodox Christians following the Gregorian calendar, and is often referred to as the Dormition of Theotokos by Orthodox Christians. Roman Catholics are obligated to attend Mass on this day. Over the centuries, the Church, inspired by the Holy Spirit, has appreciated more and more the esteemed role of Mary in salvation history. As the mother of Jesus the Savior, she is known to have a unique relationship with Christ. Principally, she is a powerful intercessor, drawing us into a deepened intimacy with the Divine and giving a profound courage in the face of death. A major teaching of the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Church is that Mary, because of her special role in salvation history, was taken directly to heaven at the time of her death, instilling hope in the hearts of Christians for the fulfillment of Christ’s promise that those who die with Him will rise with Him.

August 28th August 28th August 28th August 28th
Christian - Orthodox Nativity of the Theotokos (or Nativity of Mary)

This feast day commemorates the birth of Mary, Mother of Jesus, in Orthodox Christian traditions. Though not recorded in the Holy Scriptures, the story of Mary's birth is found in a second-century work known as the Book of James. The story tells of Mary's parents as childless for many years, but through prayer and faithfulness, an angel came to them announcing they would have a child.

September 8th September 8th September 8th September 8th
Islam Eid-al-Adha

Eid-Ul-Adha, the Feast of Sacrifice in the Muslim calendar, is observed after the Hajj, the annual pilgrimage to Mecca in Saudi Arabia. This Muslim observance (also known as Greater Eid) is the second most important festival in the Muslim calendar. It is traditionally a 1-3 day celebration. Some observant Muslims may celebrate the Eid with their families on all three days.

September 11th -13th September 1st - 2nd August 21st - 22nd August 11th- 12th
Hindu Pitṛ Pakṣa (Fortnight of Remembrance)

This fortnight is dedicated to the remembrance of the ancestors, but specifically of those members of one's family who have passed away. During this period, Hindus will perform an obsequial ritual offering on the lunar day during this fortnight that corresponds to the lunar date of the death of the loved one. According to scriptural directives, this must be completed before midday. 

September 16th - 30th 

September 6th - 19th 

September 25th - October 8th 

September 13th - 28th

Hindu

Navarātrī (Durga Puja)                             Navarātrī (Durga Puja) is celebrated over nine nights to invoke the energy of God in the form of the universal mother, commonly referred to as Durga, but also referred to as Devi (goddess) or Shakti (energy/power). This is the energy of God’s work of creation, preservation and destruction. Navarātrī is divided three parts for each of the three aspects of the supreme goddess. During the first three days, the supreme goddess as Durga is invoked to overcome impurities, vices, and defects. The next three days, the goddess as Lakshmi is adored as a giver of spiritual wealth. The final three days is spent in worshipping Saraswati: the goddess of wisdom. This period marks dietary restrictions like refraining from meat, fish, poultry and eggs. Many Hindus observe fasting throughout the nine days and may eat only once a day.

October 1st - 9th

September 20th - 28th

October 9th - 17th

September 29th - October 6th

Hindu

Vijayā Daśhamī/Dussehra                       The 10th day after the 9 nights of Navarātrī celebrates both the victory of Śhrī Durgā Devī over Mahiṣhāsura, and also of Lord Śhrī Rāma over Rāvaṇa. This festive day is observed by the immersion of deities used in worship over the 9 nights, or the burning of effigies of Rāvaṇa.

 

September 30th

October 18th

October 7th

Islam Hi jra- New Year 

Islamic New Year which marks the migration of the Prophet Mohammad and his followers from Mecca to Medina.

October 2nd September 22nd September 12th September 1st
Jewish Rosh Hashanah 

Rosh Hashanah, is the Jewish holiday commonly referred to as the "Jewish New Year." Rosh Hashana is observed on the first and second days of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar, Rosh Hashanah is the first of the High Holy Days or Yamim Noraim ("Days of Awe"), which are ten days specifically set aside for reflection repentance, and renewal. The Yamin Noraim conclude with Yom Kippur, the most solemn day in the Jewish calendar. Traditionally, no work is performed throughout Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (but work is performed during the intervening days). Most American Jews observe Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur.

October 2nd- 4th September 20th -22nd September 9th - 11th September 29th - October 1st
Islam Ashura 

Ashura fasting occurs on the 9th, 10th, and 11th of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar. For the majority of Muslims, including Sunni Muslims, it is a form of gratitude to the Living God for having saved Moses and the Israelites from the tyranny of slavery in Egypt. For Shi’ah Muslims, it marks the anniversary of the Battle of Karbala when Imam Husayn ibn Ali, a grandson of the prophet Muhammad, was killed by forces considered to be oppressive. Most Muslims fast on those days and usually do not take off from work.

October 11th October 1st September 20th September 10th
Jewish Yom Kippur 

Yom Kippur, “the Day of Atonement”, is the most solemn Jewish holiday. Its central themes are reflection and atonement. No work can be performed after sundown on this holiday. Jews traditionally observe this holy day with a 25-hour period of fasting and intensive prayer, often spending most of the day in synagogue services. Yom Kippur is the tenth and final day of the Ten Days of Awe.

October 11th - 12th September 29th - 30th September 18th -19th October 8th - 9th
Jewish

Sukkot                                                        Sukkot (“Feast of Booths” or “Feast of Tabernacles”) is a Jewish biblical pilgrimage festival that begins in autumn on the 15th day of the month of Tishrei, the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar. For most Jewish communities, the holiday lasts eight days. Traditionally, no work is performed on the first two days of Sukkot.

October 16th - 23rd October 4th - 11th September 23rd - 30th October 13th - 20th
Jewish Shmini Atzeret 

Shmini Atzeret ("the Eighth day of Assembly") is a Jewish holiday celebrated on the 22nd day of the Hebrew month of Tishrei. It is most notable for its prayer for rain, as it indicates the beginning of the rainy season in Israel. No work can be performed after sundown on this holiday.

October 23rd - 24th October 11th - 12th September 30th - October 1st October 20th - 21st
Jewish Simchat Torah

Simchat Torah is the Jewish holiday that celebrates the beginning of the new cycle of Torah (Five Books of Moses) readings. It is one of the most joyous holy days of the year. No work is performed on this holiday.

October 24th- 25th October 12th - 13th October 1st- 2nd October 21st- 22nd
Hindu Diwali (Deepawali)

Diwali (Deepawali) is one of the biggest and the brightest of all Hindu festivals. Known as the festival of lights, Diwali is marked by five days of celebration. Diwali commemorates the story of the return of Lord Rama after vanquishing the demon-king Ravana. In joyous celebration of the return of their king, people illuminated the kingdom with earthen diyas (oil lamps) and burst crackers. In many places, the holiday is dedicated to the Goddess Lakshmi, Goddess of Wisdom, but is sometimes dedicated to Goddess Kali, Goddess of Power. Hindus, Sikhs, and Jains celebrate this festival with family and friends with elaborate display of lamps and sweets in Temples and at home. Many Hindus refrain from work on this day and celebrate by distributing sweets to others.

October 29th

 

October 18th 

 

November 6th October 27th
Christian - Catholic All Saints Day 

All Saints Day is a holy day when Roman Catholics are obligated to attend Mass. Many Protestant churches celebrate this feast on the Sunday following Nov. 1. This feast celebrates holy men and women across the ages who have died and who now serve as models of Christian living. Because they enjoy life with God in heaven, the saints act as intercessors on our behalf, praying for us and encouraging us in the ordinary demands of everyday living. Christians profess a belief in the “communion of saints,” a conviction that the love of God, which knows no bounds, binds both the living and the dead in one family.

November 1st November 1st November 1st November 1st
Christian - Orthodox (Gregorian calendar) Nativity Fast 

Nativity Fast for Eastern Orthodox Christians is observed from November 15 to December 24, inclusively. This fast is a spiritual preparation for the feast of the Nativity of Christ. These dates apply to those Orthodox Churches that use the Revised Julian calendar, which currently matches the Gregorian calendar. For those Eastern Orthodox Churches that still follow the Julian calendar (Churches of Russia, Georgia, Serbia, Ukraine, Macedonia, Mount Athos and Jerusalem) the Winter Lent does not begin until November 28 (Gregorian), which coincides with November 15 on the Julian calendar.

November 15th - December 24th

November 15th - December 24th

November 15th - December 24th

November 15th - December 24th

Christian - Orthodox (Julian calendar) Nativity Fast

Nativity Fast for Eastern Orthodox Christians is observed from November 15 to December 24, inclusively. This fast is a spiritual preparation for the feast of the Nativity of Christ. These dates apply to those Orthodox Churches that use the Revised Julian calendar, which currently matches the Gregorian calendar. For those Eastern Orthodox Churches that still follow the Julian calendar (Churches of Russia, Georgia, Serbia, Ukraine, Macedonia, Mount Athos and Jerusalem) the Winter Lent does not begin until November 28 (Gregorian), which coincides with November 15 on the Julian calendar.

November 27th - January 7th

November 27th - January 7th

November 27th - January 7th

November 27th - January 7th

Christian Advent begins

Advent season begins. Advent is a season of four Sundays, celebrated by the Christian Church, culminating in the feast of Christmas.  The word "Advent" is derived from the Latin adventus, which means "coming."  The season proclaims the comings of the Christ - whose birth the Church prepares to celebrate once again, who comes continually in the Word proclaimed and in the sacraments, and whose return in glory the Church anticipates.  Each year Advent calls the Christian communities to prepare for these comings through fasting, service, and prayer.

November 27th December 3rd December 2nd December 1st
Jewish Chanukah

Chanukah is also known as the Festival of Lights. Chanukah is an eight-day holiday commemorating the rededication of the Second Temple in Jerusalem at the time of the Maccabean Revolt of the 2nd century BCE. Jewish observance includes the lighting of a special candelabra called Chanukiah, which has eight branches. The holiday is a working holiday in its entirety.

December 24th - January 1st December 12th - 20th December 2nd - 10th December 22nd - 30th
Christian - Catholic

The Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary                                     It is a holy day when Roman Catholics are obligated to attend Mass. Whereas the feast of the Assumption highlights the esteemed role of Mary in salvation history from the perspective of the end of her life, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception highlights Mary’s role from the perspective of the beginning of her life. As the mother of Jesus the Savior, she is known to have a unique relationship with Christ. Principally, she is a powerful intercessor, inspiring us to have hearts ready for an encounter with God and to receive the grace to battle sin. A major teaching of the Catholic Church is that Mary was kept sinless from the first moment of her conception, instilling hope in the hearts of Christians for freedom from our sins and for freedom to do good deeds.

December 8th December 8th December 8th December 8th
Christian Christmas

Christmas, or the Solemnity of the Nativity of Our Lord Jesus Christ. On this day, Roman Catholics, Protestants, and Eastern Orthodox Christians who follow the Gregorian calendar celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, to Mary and Joseph in Bethlehem. This is a holy day of obligation for Catholics. Many Christians begin the celebration on Christmas Eve. Liturgically speaking, Christmas triggers a festive season that extends until the celebration of the Baptism of Jesus in January. The belief that God becomes a human being in Jesus (also known as the Incarnation) is too great of a mystery to appropriate in one day, so Christians celebrate Christmas for a couple of weeks. Having received the wondrous gift of Jesus, the Savior from our sin and death, Christians respond by in turn giving gifts to loved ones and to the poor, so that the good news of the Savior’s presence among us may draw all people more closely to God and to unity, peace, and justice within the human family.

December 25th December 25th December 25th December 25th
Christian - Catholic Solemnity of Mary, the Holy Mother of God

Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God is a holy day for Roman Catholics, who are obligated to attend Mass. The context for this religious celebration is the liturgical season of Christmas, a period of time for Christians to ponder the great religious mystery of God-among-us in Jesus Christ. Mary, specially chosen to be the Mother of Christ and the Mother of the Church, has an elevated place of honor in the Church’s tradition. She is an esteemed intercessor, who draws us closer to the experience of salvation, which is deeper union with God and peace among us. In particular, Christians today pray for world peace as a gift of Mary’s Son, the Prince of Peace.

January 1st January 1st January 1st January 1st
Christian Epiphany of the Lord

Epiphany of the Lord is an even more ancient celebration among Christians than Christmas. The celebration originally focused on the nativity, incarnation, and baptism of the Christ.  Today, the coming of the wise men (magi) who brought the three gifts (gold, frankincense, and myrrh) to the Christ child is celebrated.  In most Latin American countries, this day is celebrated as Three Kings Day or Dia de Los Reyes.  The day is celebrated in those cultures with plays and special songs that emphasize the coming of the kings and their gifts for the Christ child.  

January 6th January 6th January 6th January 6th
Christian - Orthodox Epiphany of the Lord

Epiphany of the Lord is an even more ancient celebration among Christians than Christmas. The celebration originally focused on the nativity, incarnation, and baptism of the Christ.  Today, the coming of the wise men (magi) who brought the three gifts (gold, frankincense, and myrrh) to the Christ child is celebrated.  In most Latin American countries, this day is celebrated as Three Kings Day or Dia de Los Reyes.  The day is celebrated in those cultures with plays and special songs that emphasize the coming of the kings and their gifts for the Christ child.  

January 6th January 6th January 6th January 6th
Christian - Orthodox Christmas

Christmas for Eastern Orthodox Christians following the Julian calendar. On this day, Orthodox Christians celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ, the Son of God, to Mary and Joseph in Bethlehem.

January 7th January 7th January 7th January 7th
Hindu Makara Saṅkrānti / Pongal

Celebrated throughout South Asia and South East Asia, this celebration marks the start of the bright-half of the year. The South Indian celebration is known as Pongal and is celebrated with great eclat. 

January 14th January 14th January 14th January 14th
Hindu

Vasant Pañcamī / Sarasvatī       PūjāSarasvatī is the feminine form of the Supreme Being who personifies wisdom, arts, education and music. Throughout the Hindu and Jain educational world, Sarasvatī Pūjā is celebrated with cultural shows, but at the heart of the festival is the worship ceremonies of Sarasvatī. Fasting until the conclusion of the worship service is normal.

February 1st

January 21st February 9th January 29th
Hindu

Mahāśivarātrī (Shiv Ratri)                  Lord Shiva is the form of the Supreme that is worshipped by followers of Shaivism (one of the 4 Hindu religions) as the Monotheist Lord. This festival is observed in His honour by all Hindus, regardless of religious affiliation by 24 hours of fasting from food and water, and by keeping vigil. Those who are sick or otherwise unable are excused from the vigorous fast. 

February 24th

February 13th March 4th February 21st
Christian - Orthodox Beginning of Great Lent/Clean Monday

The forty days of Lent are a time of spiritual renewal and preparation for the most solemn feast day in the Christian religion – Pascha (Easter). Prayer, almsgiving, and fasting are traditional practices during Lent. The church prescribes abstaining from “animal products” during Great Lent and Holy Week. Most Orthodox Christians do not eat any meat during this time. Orthodox Lent is the forty days before Holy Week – Holy Week itself is considered a separate entity – so the entire period of fasting is actually March 14 – April 30.

February 27th February 19th March 11th March 2nd
Christian Ash Wednesday(Lent begins)

Ash Wednesday begins the liturgical season of Lent in the Roman Catholic and Protestant calendars by proclaiming a day of fasting and a period of repentance. The forty days of Lent are a time of spiritual renewal and preparation for the most solemn feast day in the Christian religion – Easter. Prayer, almsgiving, and fasting are traditional practices during Lent. On this day, many Christians will participate in a Church prayer service expressing their hope in God’s mercy and their need for help to overcome sin. The faithful receive ashes on their forehead as a sign of how they are creatures – not God. The ashes also announce their acceptance of the Gospel and their commitment to reform their lives. Roman Catholics fast and refrain from eating meat on this day.

March 1st Feburary 14th March 6th February 26th
Jewish Purim

Purim, a festive holiday marking the events recorded in the Book of Esther. Traditionally no work is performed.

March 11th - 12th Feburary 28th - March 1st March 20th - 21th March 9th -10th
Hindu Holi

The Hindu festival of Holī celebrates the vibrancy of spring, and is associated with the vernal pastimes of the various incarnations of the Supreme. The original celebration centered around a young boy named Prahlāda, whose tyrant of a father named Hiraṇyakaśipu, the king of India, made everyone replace worshipping God with worshipping him. Prahlāda did not submit to this, and continued his devotions to God. The king, after trying many times to convince him, sentenced the boy to death. However, after many unsuccessful attempts, he summoned his sister the daemoness Holikā, who had a special gift: fire could not harm her. She took the boy and sat in a fire. After the blaze had subsided, people saw that Prahlāda, who was reciting God's name, was unburned and Holikā was reduced to ashes. The people joyfully spread the ashes on their friends, as a reminder of the power of true devotion. Today, this is commemorated in the Holi bonfire the night before Holi, and then on Holi morning, the ashes used to start the festival, followed by dry colours which represent the ashes and the joy of devotion. A day of food (prepared according to Zero-Karma methods) and fun. 

March 12th March 2nd March 21st March 9th

Christian

The Annunciation                                    This day marks the announcement by the angel Gabriel to the Virgin Mary that she would conceive and bear a son, who would be called Jesus. The feast is always celebrated on March 25th, unless this falls during Holy Week, in which case it is moved to the Monday after the Second Sunday of Easter. The Eastern Orthodox do not move the date under any circumstance.

March 25th

April 9th

March 25th

March 25th

Hindu

Hindu New Year / Yugādi / Ugadi Padwa / Spring Navarātrī                         The Hindu New Year is celebrated on this day with prayers and charity. Different regional manifestations of the celebrations and rituals may cause any one given Hindu to observe the day different to another. For one it may be a day of merriment, whilst for the other it may be a day of serious prayer and contemplation. It is also the start of 9-days of fasting for the Spring Navarātrī (see Navarātrī above for the significance of this). There are 4 Navarātrīs a year, with the Spring festival being more prayerful, the other two reserved for spiritual practitioners and the autumnal Navarātrī as a time for celebration. 

March 28th 

March 18th

April 5th

March 24th

Hindu

Rāma Navamī                                               The appearance of the incarnation of Lord Rāma. Fast until midday. 

April 4th March 25th April 13th April 2nd
Jain

Mahavir Jayanti                                         The birthday of Lord Mahāvīra, the last Tīrthaṅkara of Jainism.

April 8th TBA TBA TBA
Christian Palm (Passion) Sunday

Palm (or Passion) Sunday is the day Christians celebrate Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem before his crucifixion and death.  Churches bless and distribute palm branches to remember the branches the crowd placed before Jesus as he entered the city.  In addition to this celebration, Catholic and Episcopalian churches also commemorate Jesus’ suffering and death on this day by reading a Gospel account of the events that led to his death.  Palm Sunday is the beginning of Holy Week – a solemn week of prayer and liturgical observances leading up to the celebration of Easter a week later.

April 9th March 25th April 14th April 5th
Christian - Orthodox Palm Sunday

Palm (or Passion) Sunday is the day Christians celebrate Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem before his crucifixion and death.  Churches bless and distribute palm branches to remember the branches the crowd placed before Jesus as he entered the city.  In addition to this celebration, Catholic and Episcopalian churches also commemorate Jesus’ suffering and death on this day by reading a Gospel account of the events that led to his death.  Palm Sunday is the beginning of Holy Week – a solemn week of prayer and liturgical observances leading up to the celebration of Easter a week later.

April 9th April 1st April 21st April 12th
Jewish Pesach (Passover)

The evening of April 22 marks the beginning of Passover for Jews. Pesach means “to pass over.” It refers to God’s "passing over" the houses of the children of Israel in their liberation from Egyptian slavery. No work can be performed after sundown on this date. Passover lasts eight days. The first two days and last two days are holy days, when no work is performed. Work can be performed during intermediate days.

April 10th - 18th March 30th - April 7th April 19th - 27th April 8th - 16th
Christian Holy Thursday

Holy (or Maundy) Thursday is the day Christians commemorate the “Last Supper” that Jesus Christ shared with his disciples.  In many denominations, Christians gather in the evening to remember this meal.  Some services include a ritual of washing of feet, which imitates how Jesus washed the feet of his disciples as a sign of his love and his commissioning them to serve.  In Catholic and some Protestant traditions, this celebration is the beginning of the Easter Triduum, three holy days, which mark the one, salvific event of Christ's passion, death, and resurrection.

April 13th March 29th April 18th April 9th
Christian Good Friday

Good Friday (also Holy Friday for Eastern Orthodox Christians) marks the day that Jesus Christ died on the cross.  Many Christians gather in the afternoon or evening to hear the proclamation of the Passion of Jesus Christ, as recorded in Scripture.  At these services, they offer prayers for the needs of the Church and the world.  Some Christian denominations venerate the cross as the great price paid for our salvation, and they experience communion with our Savior by eating the consecrated bread.  Roman Catholics fast and refrain from eating meat on this day.

April 14th March 30th April 19th April 10th
Sikh

Vaisakhī/Baisakhī                                           The founding of the Sikh faith in 1699 is commemorated on this day by Sikhs worldwide with prayers, processions and charity.

April 14th TBA TBA TBA
Christian Holy Saturday

Holy Saturday is a day of prayer and quiet for some Christian denominations, awaiting the Easter Vigil service, the beginning of the celebration of Easter Sunday. During the Easter Vigil liturgy, Christians joyfully celebrate the resurrection of Jesus Christ. At the Easter Vigil, adults who are baptized in other faith traditions or have not been baptized are welcomed into the Church.

April 15th March 31st April 20th April 11th
Christian Easter Sunday

Easter Sunday is the most solemn holy day in the Christian calendar, celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ, when God the Father raised Jesus Christ from the dead. Thus begins the Easter season, a fifty-day celebration to ponder the significance of the awesome mystery of the resurrection: how Christ conquered sin and death and invites us to share in the resurrection. For Christians, the resurrection of Jesus Christ is the ultimate sign of God’s faithfulness to us and the assurance that death, violence, and despair will not have the last word. This is a time of great hope. As a season, Easter ends 50 days hence with the celebration of the Feast of Pentecost, the commemoration of the outpouring of the Holy Spirit on the first disciples and the founding of the Church. The Holy Spirit draws all Christians closer together and missions them to proclaim the Gospel of Jesus Christ and to serve others, especially those most in need. The Christian churches celebrate Pentecost on June 8 of this year.

April 16th April 1st April 21st April 12th
Christian - Orthodox Pascha (Easter)

Pascha (Easter) for Eastern Orthodox Christians. The celebration of the resurrection of Christ starts with a vigil service on the Saturday evening before Pascha, which is timed to end at midnight. At this point the gathered community begins the Paschal celebration, lasting for several hours.

April 16th April 8th April 28th April 19th
Buddhist

Wesak / Vaiśākha Pūrṇima                       The Birthday of Lord Buddha. For some it is also his enlightenment and parinirvāṇa day also.

May 10th TBA TBA TBA
Christian Solemnity of Ascension of the Lord

Solemnity of the Ascension of the Lord is a holy day of obligation for Roman Catholics marking the ascension of the risen Lord to the right hand of his Father in heaven. This comes forty days after Easter. However, in the Catholic Archdiocese of Washington, as in many dioceses in the U.S., the feast is transferred to the Sunday following the 40th day. This feast, also celebrated by Protestant churches, deepens the Christian’s experience and understanding of the mystery of the resurrection. Jesus Christ lived two thousand years ago in space and time. As a consequence of the resurrection, Jesus Christ is no longer limited by space and time. As Son of God, Jesus overcomes these limits and is present to believers of every age.

May 25th May 10th May 30th May 21st
Christian - Orthodox Ascension

Ascension for Eastern Orthodox Christians marking the ascension of the risen Lord to the right hand of his Father in heaven. Coming forty days after Easter, the Ascension deepens the Christian’s experience and understanding of the mystery of the resurrection. Jesus Christ lived two thousand years ago in space and time. As a consequence of the resurrection, Jesus Christ is no longer limited by space and time. As Son of God, Jesus overcomes these limits and is present to believers of every age.

May 25th May 17th June 6th May 28th
Islam Ramadan

Ramadan starts on the 28th of June and continues for 30 days. This Muslim religious observance takes place during the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, the month in which the Qur'an was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad. During Ramadan, Muslims fast, not eating or drinking anything from sunrise to sunset. In their prayer, they ask for forgiveness from sins, practice self-discipline, and commit themselves to good deeds. Each day of fasting concludes with common prayer and a meal, iftar.

May 27th - June 26th, 2017 May 16th- June 15th, 2018 May 6th - June 5th, 2019 April 24th- May 23rd, 2020
Jewish Shavuot

This Jewish holy day commemorates the anniversary of the day God gave the Ten Commandments to Moses and the Israelites at Mount Sinai. Shavuot is celebrated fifty days after Passover. The date of Shavuot is directly linked to that of Passover. On Passover, the Jewish people were freed from their enslavement to Pharaoh; on Shavuot they were given the Torah and became a nation committed to serving God. No work can be performed after sundown on this date.

May 30th - June 1st May 19th - 21st June 8th -10th May 28th - 30th
Christian Pentecost

Celebrated fifty days after Easter, the Christian Pentecost refers to the descent of the Holy Spirit on the early Christians following the ascension of Jesus.

June 4th May 20th June 9th May 31st
Christian - Orthodox Pentecost

Celebrated fifty days after Easter, the Christian Pentecost refers to the descent of the Holy Spirit on the early Christians following the ascension of Jesus.

June 4th May 27th June 16th June 7th
Hindu

Nirjalā Ekādaśī                                               The most important of the recurring fortnightly fasts in the Hindu calendar. Performed without food or water for 24 hours.

June 4th TBA TBA TBA