Magis Immersion Experiences

Students in Barcelona on Magis Spain '22

Photo taken by Blain Beyene (C’25) in Barcelona on Magis Spain ’22

Magis Immersion Seminars

The Magis Immersion Seminars (MIS) are intensive, experiential 3 credit learning opportunities that embody Georgetown University’s commitment to Educating the Whole Person. These “6+1” courses invite undergraduate students from the Sophomore, Junior, or Senior classes at Georgetown into intensive, in-class learning experiences for the first half of each spring semester, followed by a required, on-the-ground experiential learning week during Spring Break. After returning from their Spring Break immersion experience, students will undertake an independent study project – overseen by their course instructor –  to complete the course. Throughout the course, students will not only engage in rigorous academic study, but will be accompanied by a spiritual leader from the Office of Mission & Ministry to help round out their experiences in the classroom and on-the-ground over Spring Break. These courses embody the University’s commitment to the Spirit of Georgetown values of Academic Excellence, Educating the Whole Person, and Cura Personalis.

If you have any questions please email, missionandministry@georgetown.edu (new window).

Students on a rooftop in Rome on Ash Wednesday holding a Georgetown University flag

Instructor: Dr. Mark Bosco, S.J.

This course is a collaboration with the Department of Theology & Religious Studies, and is open to all undergraduate students in the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. 

Pilgrimage is central to all the major religions. Since time immemorial, humans have taken spiritual journeys to sacred destinations. A pilgrimage can be a visceral performance of the search for meaning in daily life, an attempt to find greater sense of spiritual well-being, or a reconfirmation of one’s faith commitments. For any Christian, the city of Rome, more than any other destination, still has the power to fascinate and invigorate belief. The many layers of Rome offer a way for Christians and other seekers to encounter the faith of the apostles, the church fathers and mothers, great medieval saints, the world of Renaissance popes, the Jesuit contributions to the faith, and the modern Church in all of its vitality. With Rome as our classroom, we will investigate the theological, historical, sociological, and literary contours of pilgrimage.  The course will be based in the Roman Catholic tradition, but will attempt to make some comparisons with other faith traditions as well.

To apply for a place in this Magis Immersion Seminar in Rome, please complete this form. The deadline for applications is Friday, 6 October 2023.

Instructors: Dr. Ryann Craig, Imam Yahya Hendi,

This course is a collaboration with the Department of Theology & Religious Studies, and is open to all undergraduate students in the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. 

Jordan lies at the crossroads of historical and contemporary interfaith encounters between Muslims and Christians, often serving as a regional bridge between and among religious traditions and modern geopolitical identities. This seminar explores how Muslims and Christians in Jordan navigate living and working alongside each other in a variety of sectors: education and youth, healthcare, humanitarian, tourism and civil society. We will briefly explore the main tenets of Christianity and Islam before providing an overview of the different Christian and Muslim communities in Jordan, especially considering their relationships with Palestinian refugees in Jordan, and their history of interfaith dialogue. We will explore elements of civil society as well as new religious, political, and practical challenges to and pathways toward regional peace. Though obstacles and avenues to peace are not solely religious, we will ask religious communities on the ground how they sit at the crossroads to peace and imagine creating lasting peace.

To apply for a place in this Magis Immersion Seminar to Jordan, please complete this form. The deadline for applications is Friday, 6 October 2022.

A group of people posing in front of a glass wall overlooking the Parthenon in the background

Instructor: Prof. Ori Z Soltes

This course is a collaboration with the Department of Theology & Religious Studies, and is open to all undergraduate students in the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. 

This course studies the peculiarly urban character of Paul of Tarsus’ missionary activity in the Eastern Roman Empire with an emphasis on Greece. Christianity got its start as a Judaean sect in rural Judaea/Palestine. Its spread and development in the late first century CE took place in the cities where Paul and his associates established distinct communities practicing a form of Jesus Messianism—we might call them “Judaeans for Jesus.” Growing out of mainstream Judaeanism, this movement soon attracted Gentiles—pagans—in the cities where the Pauline mission located itself.

The first seven weeks of the course will focus on the letters that Paul wrote to the communities that he established in Corinth, Thessaloniki, and Philippi in Greece, and Galatia in Asia Minor (today’s Turkey)—against three aspects of background and context: the pagan Greek and Roman world of which he and his community were part; the Judaean community of which he was part and its evolution from a Hebrew-Israelite community into a Judaean community and towards Jewish and Christian communities; the putative context in which he evolved from Saul of Tarsus to Paul. Our sources obviously, extend beyond words ascribed to him in the letters. Most obviously, for instance, while he did not establish a community in Athens, Luke in the Acts of the Apostles portrays his missionary work in that key Greek city.

The purpose of the pre-spring-break part of this course is to prepare us for the immersion experience during spring break, where we will follow in the footsteps of St. Paul. Thus a close reading of his letters and related other material is essential for gaining sufficient knowledge of Paul and his associates as well as of the people to whom he was preaching in the Greek cities that we will visit during spring break.

To apply for a place in this Magis Immersion Seminar to Greece, please complete this form. The deadline for applications is Friday, 6 October 2023.

A Cathedral clock tower in the foreground surrounded by trees and shrubs. The Cathedral Church of Our Lady of the Immaculate Conception in Seoul, Korea

Instructor: Dr. Min-Ah Cho.

This course is a collaboration with the Department of Theology & Religious Studies, and is open to all undergraduate students in the sophomore, junior, and senior classes. 

The MAGIS Immersion Seminar/Course, titled “Korean Catholics and the Interfaith Quest for Justice” delves into the pursuit of justice and peace within and beyond the context of Catholicism in Korea. Through collaboration with local individuals, including Korean Jesuits, scholars, activists, and students, the seminar explores Korea’s modern history shaped by events such as Japan’s annexation of Korea, the Korean War, the rapid growth of capitalism, and ongoing democratization movements. Amidst multifaceted narratives and contemporary dynamism, we examine the nation’s geopolitical significance, illuminated by the 70-year armistice following the Korean War, escalating tensions in Northeast Asia—particularly its relationship with the USA—and the pivotal role faith communities play in the pursuit of justice and peace.

To apply for a place in this Magis Immersion Seminar to South Korea, please complete this form. The deadline for applications is Friday, 6 October 2022.